Meet Shruti

Say hello to Shruti, our mentorship coordinator with the undergraduate WiSE group at Stony Brook and globetrotter. When she’s not researching our genome to better understand it’s relationship to cancer and psychiatric disorders, she loves to travel, meet people, and try new things. Check out what she has to say on getting more women interested in STEM!

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BY: Mikaela Dunkin

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Stats from Angela Saini’s Inferior

We’re kicking off Spring Semester 2019 right – with a new book club and a new outlook on how science impacts society’s view on women. Our inaugural book is Angela Saini’s Inferior, where she tackles years of data, biases, and up-and-coming research that is taking what it means to be female in a whole different direction.

BY: Mikaela Dunkin

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New Year, New Funding: Top 10 Fellowships for Women

As graduate students we are always on that grant grind. Not only for the accolades, but also for the extra funding because, hey – it can’t hurt right? So we gathered together some grants (in no particular order) that you can look out for throughout the year!

BY: Alison McCarthy

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12 Books to Ring in the New Year

BY: Mikaela Dunkin

In honor of our new book club (sign up HERE, if you want to get in on the fun!), we decided to compile a list of the books we are excited to read in the coming year. Whether you’re a curl up by the fireplace reader or a lounge at the the beach reader, we’ve got your next fem- and steminist books right here.

Facts for your Feminist Agenda

1.Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong -and the New Research That’s Rewriting the Story by Angela Saini

Women are the inferior sex, right? Wrong! For hundreds of years, everyone believed that ladies were all around the weaker and used that as a justification for their subservient roles. Charles Darwin asserted that women were less evolved than men and for quite a while other male scientists supported him. Even now, science tells us that men and women are different and claim that even on a biological level, we have different tasks hard-wired into our DNA. Angela Saini challenges this and reveals with new data that women are just as smart and strong as men.

 “I first stumbled across this book on @stemminist, a twitter-based book club for feminism and STEM. It’s a great read and will have you often muttering “what the heck” to yourself. While I wouldn’t call it a feel good read, it does feel really good to finally have the myths about us [women] get acknowledged and dispelled in this book. I cannot wait to discuss this at our first book club meeting!”

Caitlyn Cardetti (SBU)
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Meet Mikaela

Hello readers! It’s my turn to sit in the hot seat and let you know a little bit more about me. So say hello to me, Mikaela, the blog and web administrator for this site! While blogging is my night job, my daytime hours are spent in the lab developing energy storage materials. When I’m not working, I love to go horseback riding, practice acroyoga, and read high fantasy novels.

BY: Mikaela Dunkin

A black and white photo of a girl sitting down in a chair, looking over her shoulder to the left of the viewer.
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SBU Faculty: Men & Women by the Numbers

BY: Mikaela Dunkin
Contributions by: Caitlyn Cardetti & Alison McCarthy

Back in October, we had a meeting on the 11th to celebrate International Day of the Girl. While snacking on brie-stuffed strawberries and arancini, we conversed about our experiences of being women in science. We discussed statistics, sexism from peers and professors, the people that have helped us get so far, and the ones who still do. While our experiences were diverse, we were all in agreement on one thing – how beneficial it is to see other successful women in science. Whether it’s a family member, a teacher, or a celebrity, we could all think of a woman that inspired us. They are someone to point to when we are told that ‘girls aren’t good at science’ until we become that woman ourselves.

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